8 Rules for creating an expat budget. Defining Moves - the art of successful relocation. Information, inspiration and resources for the global trailing spouse, accompanying partner, expat partner.It’s Part 2 of the “8 Money Rules for Creating Your Expat Budget” post – if you missed the first part, you can read it here.

 

5. Protect Your Credit

So you think paying your bills on time is enough to get an excellent credit rating? Think again. Credit companies don’e release the formula that they use to compute your credit score, but it is a combination of length of credit history in the location (strike one- you’ve only just arrived), range and types of open credit (strike two, because you can’t get credit easily due to lack of credit history, documentation, etc etc.), ratio of credit balance to availability (strike three – any credit cards you do manage to open will have tiny limits – think $300).

The bad news is that your credit score is used for everything from renting a home to getting a cellphone contract to job applications, so you can’t avoid it. The good news is that account management has the greatest positive impact on your score after length of history and range of loans, so set up direct debit payments for at least the minimum payment for every card.

This doesn’t mean we are giving you permission to carry balances from month to month – what we are doing is protecting you against memory loss, jet lag, time zones, and general expat chaos – all things that make it very easy for due date to slip by unnoticed, until your credit score plummets like a lead balloon.

There’s a final warning, however; don’t neglect your credit back home. For large loans, many global banks will do an international credit check, which is great news unless you forgot to put your other payments on autopilot and the now overdue bills are lost somewhere between here and Outer Mongolia..

 

6. The Expat Emergency Fund

No matter how culturally aware, linguistically talented or globally experienced we might think we are, I have yet to meet an expat, HR manager or Global Mobility Specialist who can predict the future, despite what we would have you believe. Instead, we focus on the assignment, assume that everything will go perfectly and rely on finely honed problem solving skills to get us through. Predictably, it’s a monetary recipe for disaster, so you need include saving an emergency fund in your budget now.

The financial gurus will advise you to aim for and emergency fund equal to 6 months of living expenses, with an additional allowances for dependents or if you work in a highly specialized field.

For expats, what constitutes 6 months living expenses can vary greatly, and so we need to err on the side of caution. If an overseas assignment ends early, you have significant additional costs: the cost of repatriation, temporary accommodation, down payment on a home / rental deposit, household goods (especially electrical items), location appropriate clothing. Repatriates face not just the financial implications of finding a new role, but finding a new home and a new way of life.

As a guide on what your long term emergency fund should look like, use your country of citizenship as a guide - while you may be able to live more cheaply elsewhere, you are not guaranteed citizenship, especially without employment. Take into account the cost of living, but also include a figure for transportation of yourselves and your household goods and pets, housing deposits (if you don’t already own a house), temporary accommodation, health insurance (if your country doesn’t have a national health service) and interim job search costs.

The good news for those of you who don’t suffer redundancy, early termination of assignment or other loss of primary income is that you have an emergency fund that will see you through almost anything expat life throws at you. And if you think expat life is all warm milk and puppies, you might want to head over to the Expat Life and Laughter section for some timely reading..

 

7. Think Long Term

Bottom line – the average lifespan of the international assignment has us all focusing on the short term, but our nomadic lifestyles mean that we should be paying more attention to long term planning than our less transient friends. Why? Extended or repeated expatriation can mean losing eligibility for home nation benefits such as healthcare, resident school and college fees, and even (should there be any left by the time we retire) state pensions.

Expats should be putting at least 10% of their income into retirement savings; even more if you change jobs frequently, plan on retiring outside of your home nation or somewhere with a high cost of living. Younger expats also need to budget for college fees for children, especially if their career path takes them through the US.

The good news is that many expats are eligible for tax free savings and investments accounts if they reside outside their home location for a named period, however you will need to get advice from a reputable investment advisor who is familiar with both your long term lifestyle goals and the tax rules for your country of citizenship.

 

8. Insuring Against the Unknown.

Somehow, we always seem to come back to the tricky subject of what happens if the worst happens, but it’s one of the most important pieces of your expat financial plan. ¬†Life insurance for both partners is vital – while often only one partner is a direct income earner, that ability to fulfill the demands of the role is facilitated by the supporting partner.

The fundamental questions to ask about life insurance include length, value and cost of the policy, how premiums / eligibility changes according to location, health and age of the policy holders, and in the case of company provided policies, what happens of you leave the company?

You may also want to consider long term care (LTC) and disability policies – while not often included in employment benefits, they are extremely important, especially in light of the rising cost of health care. They will need careful consideration – many policies will exclude specific locations, activities or have requirements for redemption, so make sure that any policy you take out accurately meets your needs. More expensive premiums are infinitely preferable to risking a denied claim.

 

If it all seems overwhelming, don’t panic. We’re not expecting you to get everything done today, or even this week or this month. The most important thing you can do is something; most of the items on the list take under an hour to get set up and get started, and once automated, can carry on building quietly in the background. As for the rest? It’s up to you..

 

Additional Resources

The Household CFO РA Financial Guide for Expat Spouses.  Excellent basic guide to expat finances, from highly respected financial advisors writing in a way the rest of us can understand. (Email address required)

Credit Karma. Free credit score access with no pull on your credit record. (Email signup required, but the emails are rare, and are a very helpful reminder to check your credit)

Five Free Financial Favorites. Previous post with links to some great resources (including Credit Karma)

Tagged with:
 

One Response to 8 Money Rules for Creating Your Expat Budget

  1. Very practical and helpful! Thank you for sharing!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

* Copy This Password *

* Type Or Paste Password Here *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>