Category Archives: Identity Theft

Facebook settings.

Birthday Approaching? Change your Facebook Privacy Settings…

Facebook settingsFacebook have replaced Apple as the leaders in constantly changing terms and conditions, but with far greater consequences. Where their privacy settings previously allowed you to limit who saw what, now all bets are off and it only takes an ill-advised tag to have your worst moments immortalized.

So, while we are busy safeguarding our children from the perils of social media, a new challenge has snuck up from behind. Poor eyesight and the Facebook app…

I am now in the ‘of a certain age’ group, and frankly, things are starting to go a little downhill. Along with the anti-aging creams and the increasing reliance on Spanx, we are now seeing (or not) increasing use of reading glasses and the large font setting on your iPhone.

All very well, until you factor in the constantly changing privacy settings. It’s easy to pictorially record a moment for posterity and share it with the world, but when you are doing it on a two inch screen without your glasses on, it’s a recipe for disaster.

Now, when someone tags you in their status updates and adds a particularly awful photo of you, they may think they are only sharing it with their own friends, but they are not. They are sharing it with yours, and everyone else mentioned in that darn update. And as viewers around the globe share their condolences on the loss of your dignity, they just add fuel to the fire. Cos it’s now gone out to their friends, too…

[Tweet “A  new social media challenge has snuck up on the over 40s. Poor eyesight and the Facebook app.”]

You know it’s bad when my sister (also known for her fetching array of dodgy photos) laughs solidly for 10 minutes. On an international phone line. She has grown up with me, and has thus been witness to some blinders, but even she was impressed.

While Facebook is a wonderful tool for staying connected with friends, families and networks, never forget that it’s primarily a profit-driven business. It makes money by leveraging your activity against advertising access, which means it wants as many people as possible to see what you are up to. It then charges businesses to gain access to you, your activity and your network, and the more unrestricted (i.e. tagging, liking and commenting without setting individual privacy limits) interaction you have, the more valuable you are.

[Tweet “Check your Facebook privacy settings now. Once it’s out there, it’s ‘shampooing-the-cat’ difficult to get back”]

Let this be a lesson to you: check your Facebook privacy settings every time you post, comment and like, and while you are at it, consider adding your own internal filter before your fingers hit the keyboard. Because once it’s out there, it’s damn near impossible to get back. (Think shampooing-the-cat difficult…).

For those of you about to embark on a birthday weekend away with friends, here’s my ‘How to Remain Friends and Not Humiliate People” checklist. You might want to print them out and distribute them with the boarding passes…

 

1. Agree a “Posting and Tagging” policy pre-departure. Facebook is a minefield when it comes to offending people whose city you are visiting – especially if you aren’t visiting them.

2. If you post status updates to Facebook, notify anyone pre-tag so that they can have editorial approval. Your friends may find your offbeat humor hilarious, but their co-workers / future employers / elderly relatives may not.

3. Check your privacy settings before you go, and select either ‘just me’ or close friends. This video will take you through the umpteen places you need to do this.

4. If anything untoward creeps through, untag yourself or ask the poster to remove it. Never comment directly on the offending pic/post; doing so triggers a notification to your network and makes it even more visible.

5. If you are over 40, posting photos of people from your iPhone is strictly prohibited… Seriously.

6. As a last resort, temporarily ‘unfriending’ your travel companions will prevent them being able to tag you, so your network will stay blissfully oblivious. The bad news is that you won’t be able to see what’s being posted, but any shared friends will…

 

So off you go. Now. Before Many Happy Returns takes on a whole new meaning…

 

heartbleed: the expat edition

Heartbleed: the expat edition

heartbleed: the expat editionContrary to the mythical serenity of expat life, 2014 has been the year of security breaches in the Defining Moves household. And we don’t seem to be rising to the challenge.

In February, our cars were broken into while they sat in our driveway, under the carport. There are two things of note with this; firstly, the only reason we knew that they had been targeted was that the thieves very kindly left the doors open so as not to wake us. Hence the first conversation was not “we’ve been burgled” but a lengthy, accusation ruled tirade about “who came in last and left the car doors open”..

It continued in the same vein when the Sheriff arrived. Her first question pertained to the ‘break-in’, at which point I squirmed.

” Define the term ‘break’..?”

Predictably, we had all left our car doors unlocked, and the genius in the family (that would be me) had also left a handbag in the car, now noticeably absent. A round of lengthy phone calls to the Department of Motor Vehicles, various card companies and the bank ensued.

By far the most annoying part of all this was the Other Half, who constantly nags me about locking the car when leaving it for more than three seconds, and who correctly predicted that I had left my purse in it. There are few things in life more irritating than the words ‘I told you so’ coming from a smug spouse.

The theme continued last week, with the advent of the HeartBleed virus. It prompted a flutter of panic in my heart, not so much the virus itself, but thought of

  1.  remembering all those passwords in the first place and
  2. having to update all the people who I shared said passwords with.

There is a certain irony when hackers are the only people who actually do know your log in details..

The Other Half came up trumps, with a list of sites affected that narrowed down my workload to a mere sliver. I crafted a new password that would pass even the most convoluted security requirement and set to work. And promptly spent the rest of the evening binging on Hulu’s back catalogue, which according to my list, was one of the sites unaffected. Safety first, I always say.

But the Gods of spousal comeuppance were smiling on me this morning, as the Other Half trudged into the bedroom with a strong waft of Burning Martyr following close behind.

“Why were you so late to bed last night?”

“I was changing all the passwords.” (said with a pious, superior air.) Do you know how many we have for all our expat health insurance? And our credit union accounts? But don’t worry, we’ve got a really strong password now”

At which point he reels off a long string of garbled numbers, letters and symbols that Bletchley Park would struggle to remember. And judging by the number of hesitations, missteps and corrections, so did he.

Cue pregnant pause.

Me: “Please tell me you did only do the ones that were listed on that email you sent me? The sites that actually use Open SSL encryption?”

OH: Silence

OH: “I’ll write the password down for you.”

Good to know that security is a priority. Now anyone who wants to get hold of our passwords has to navigate the enormous stack of unfiled paperwork that the Other Half leaves constantly in his wake.

Sometimes, low tech is the best defense.

 

8 Rules for creating an expat budget. Defining Moves - the art of successful relocation. Information, inspiration and resources for the global trailing spouse, accompanying partner, expat partner.

8 Money Rules for Creating Your Expat Budget

8 Rules for creating an expat budget. Defining Moves - the art of successful relocation. Information, inspiration and resources for the global trailing spouse, accompanying partner, expat partner.It’s Part 2 of the “8 Money Rules for Creating Your Expat Budget” post – if you missed the first part, you can read it here.

 

5. Protect Your Credit

So you think paying your bills on time is enough to get an excellent credit rating? Think again. Credit companies don’e release the formula that they use to compute your credit score, but it is a combination of length of credit history in the location (strike one- you’ve only just arrived), range and types of open credit (strike two, because you can’t get credit easily due to lack of credit history, documentation, etc etc.), ratio of credit balance to availability (strike three – any credit cards you do manage to open will have tiny limits – think $300).

The bad news is that your credit score is used for everything from renting a home to getting a cellphone contract to job applications, so you can’t avoid it. The good news is that account management has the greatest positive impact on your score after length of history and range of loans, so set up direct debit payments for at least the minimum payment for every card.

This doesn’t mean we are giving you permission to carry balances from month to month – what we are doing is protecting you against memory loss, jet lag, time zones, and general expat chaos – all things that make it very easy for due date to slip by unnoticed, until your credit score plummets like a lead balloon.

There’s a final warning, however; don’t neglect your credit back home. For large loans, many global banks will do an international credit check, which is great news unless you forgot to put your other payments on autopilot and the now overdue bills are lost somewhere between here and Outer Mongolia..

 

6. The Expat Emergency Fund

No matter how culturally aware, linguistically talented or globally experienced we might think we are, I have yet to meet an expat, HR manager or Global Mobility Specialist who can predict the future, despite what we would have you believe. Instead, we focus on the assignment, assume that everything will go perfectly and rely on finely honed problem solving skills to get us through. Predictably, it’s a monetary recipe for disaster, so you need include saving an emergency fund in your budget now.

The financial gurus will advise you to aim for and emergency fund equal to 6 months of living expenses, with an additional allowances for dependents or if you work in a highly specialized field.

For expats, what constitutes 6 months living expenses can vary greatly, and so we need to err on the side of caution. If an overseas assignment ends early, you have significant additional costs: the cost of repatriation, temporary accommodation, down payment on a home / rental deposit, household goods (especially electrical items), location appropriate clothing. Repatriates face not just the financial implications of finding a new role, but finding a new home and a new way of life.

As a guide on what your long term emergency fund should look like, use your country of citizenship as a guide – while you may be able to live more cheaply elsewhere, you are not guaranteed citizenship, especially without employment. Take into account the cost of living, but also include a figure for transportation of yourselves and your household goods and pets, housing deposits (if you don’t already own a house), temporary accommodation, health insurance (if your country doesn’t have a national health service) and interim job search costs.

The good news for those of you who don’t suffer redundancy, early termination of assignment or other loss of primary income is that you have an emergency fund that will see you through almost anything expat life throws at you. And if you think expat life is all warm milk and puppies, you might want to head over to the Expat Life and Laughter section for some timely reading..

 

7. Think Long Term

Bottom line – the average lifespan of the international assignment has us all focusing on the short term, but our nomadic lifestyles mean that we should be paying more attention to long term planning than our less transient friends. Why? Extended or repeated expatriation can mean losing eligibility for home nation benefits such as healthcare, resident school and college fees, and even (should there be any left by the time we retire) state pensions.

Expats should be putting at least 10% of their income into retirement savings; even more if you change jobs frequently, plan on retiring outside of your home nation or somewhere with a high cost of living. Younger expats also need to budget for college fees for children, especially if their career path takes them through the US.

The good news is that many expats are eligible for tax free savings and investments accounts if they reside outside their home location for a named period, however you will need to get advice from a reputable investment advisor who is familiar with both your long term lifestyle goals and the tax rules for your country of citizenship.

 

8. Insuring Against the Unknown.

Somehow, we always seem to come back to the tricky subject of what happens if the worst happens, but it’s one of the most important pieces of your expat financial plan.  Life insurance for both partners is vital – while often only one partner is a direct income earner, that ability to fulfill the demands of the role is facilitated by the supporting partner.

The fundamental questions to ask about life insurance include length, value and cost of the policy, how premiums / eligibility changes according to location, health and age of the policy holders, and in the case of company provided policies, what happens of you leave the company?

You may also want to consider long term care (LTC) and disability policies – while not often included in employment benefits, they are extremely important, especially in light of the rising cost of health care. They will need careful consideration – many policies will exclude specific locations, activities or have requirements for redemption, so make sure that any policy you take out accurately meets your needs. More expensive premiums are infinitely preferable to risking a denied claim.

 

If it all seems overwhelming, don’t panic. We’re not expecting you to get everything done today, or even this week or this month. The most important thing you can do is something; most of the items on the list take under an hour to get set up and get started, and once automated, can carry on building quietly in the background. As for the rest? It’s up to you..

 

Additional Resources

The Household CFO – A Financial Guide for Expat Spouses.  Excellent basic guide to expat finances, from highly respected financial advisors writing in a way the rest of us can understand. (Email address required)

Credit Karma. Free credit score access with no pull on your credit record. (Email signup required, but the emails are rare, and are a very helpful reminder to check your credit)

Five Free Financial Favorites. Previous post with links to some great resources (including Credit Karma)

Expat Essentials: Safeguarding your longterm health, finances and family. Defining Moves - The Art of Successful Relocation. Information, Inspiration and Resources for the Expat Trailing Spouse / Accompanying Partner

Not Just For Expats: 3 Ways to Safeguard Your Life, Health and Family at home and abroad.

Not Just for Expats - 3 steps to safeguard your longterm health, family and finances. Defining Moves The art of successful relocation
My version of long term care

This post was sparked by an episode Mad Men –  a series about adverting executives in  New York in the 50’s and 60’s.  This particular one covered the characters’ responses to the Cuban missile crisis.

Kennedy was had just given his famous television broadcast, highlighting the potential threat to the US from the Soviets, plunging the characters into a frenzy of uncharacteristic behaviors.

In justifying their sudden need to fulfill life dreams and expectations, one of the characters made the comment:

” We might not be here tomorrow”,

to which the reply came;

“Isn’t that always true?”.

We all applaud the idea of living each day as if it were your last, but are incredibly naive about what that actually means. Most of us imagine finally parachuting, walking the Inca Trail or any other number of ambitious, death defying activities listed on our bucket list. It bears little relation to the reality of life and death.

The concept of seizing the day is reliant on good health, or at least mental consciousness, the absence of pain, and a considerable amount of forward planning. If I ask how many of you have checked your medical records, understand your health insurance rights and coverage, or have an advocate who knows your wishes in the event you are unable to make decisions, 97% of the room start twitching nervously and suddenly find their notes fascinating. Sound familiar?

For those of you who are now in a state of panic, let me reassure you. You don’t need to start visiting psychics, ordering crystal balls or trying to predict every eventuality – in fact, the simpler you keep it, the better.

To get you started, here are the three essentials to consider:

 

Health Insurance for Locals and Expats Living Overseas.

For those of you who don’t live in a country with a National Health Service (and for many of you who do), for any travel abroad or residence overseas, health insurance is essential. While many services and regular care can be contracted more cheaply without going through an insurance service provider, for the expense  of chronic, emergency and long term health coverage, you need a safety net.

Sadly, most insurers are for-profit businesses, which means that they are careful (and in some cases, downright difficult) about handing out money, and have many ways of avoiding or limiting it. Not being completely honest about your age, activities, destination and current or previous health is the fastest way to get your claim rejected and end up with a huge bill.

Pre-existing conditions, so-called ‘extreme sports’ and high risk behaviors (i.e. drug taking, using prostitutes) are common exclusions and many policies only cover your host country. They often specify services and providers that you can use, required co-pays and ineligible treatment and procedures. This means that either you personally, or your family, will be liable for any healthcare costs not met by the insurers, and these can stack up really, really quickly.

The basics to consider include:

  • What exclusions apply to your policy, and are they relevant to your situation?
  • What are the insured maximums, and what does that really mean in terms of local care?
  • Are you covered for transport home?
  • In the event of your death, will your remains be repatriated or is that the responsibility of your next of kin?
  • If you have company insurance, how are your benefits affected if you are no longer able to work or have to terminate your assignment early?
  • What happens if care is not available in your host country? Will you be sent home, or to another country, and if so, can family members accompany you?
  • If you are taken ill when overseas, are you covered for a family member to join you? Who will look after the children? Who will be your advocate? How do I make my wishes known in a way that is legally binding?

 

In the event of serious or long term illness, where do you want to be?

Common wisdom dictates that we like to be surrounded by our nearest and dearest, but for some, that qualifies as the one of Dante’s Rings of Hell.

As Greta Garbo is famously uttered “I want to be left alone”.

Most of the time the answer is “wherever I can get the best care”, but the reality is harsher and involves finance, family, support and legal residence issues.

For working expats, the decision is often taken out of their hands – once you are no longer able to work, your visa is invalid, and you are repatriated. For those permanent overseas residents the choices are wider, and many choose to stay where care is cheaper and there is less pressure on family members to be full time caregivers.

Returning ‘home’ is often not as easy as it seems, and may require significant adjustment –  repatriation is difficult under the best of circumstances, so expect a period of transition for the whole family, especially if you have been expats for a long period. Consider both mental and physical health needs for all the family – there are many excellent counselors that can deal with adaptation and coping issues, both for you, your partner and your children. x

Before you take the decision to move back, you will also need to check that you are entitled to healthcare benefits – either though the national health service or via your insurance – before you move; many insurance companies will not cover people with certain pre-existing conditions or will demand high premiums, and your expat insurance may only include your host country. Consider also what is included, whether it is just urgent care, inpatient care or ongoing long term care – and also, the standard of care and and waiting lists.

.

Do you have an Advanced Directive of Health Care?

More commonly known as a Living Will, this document defines who will make decisions for your care in the event that you are unable to do, and sets guidelines for your care. We tend to assume that here only apply if we have a serious debilitating illness, however having a stated person to advocate for you is invaluable for acute and emergency medical conditions too – whether you are simply under anesthetic, unconscious, in severe pain or have temporary amnesia.

Your advocate doesn’t have to be your life partner – I have chosen my sister for four reasons: firstly, we have similar decision making processes; I would rather that my partner was free to concentrate on his own needs and those of the children; she has a great relationship with my partner and I trust her to make the best decisions for both him and I without being burdened with guilt and expectations, and finally she has a great sense of humor, and if anyone can find the laughter in any situation, it’s her.

Many doctor’s offices have ADHC template forms that you can complete, but it’s worth getting legal advice – many terms vary between states and countries. Use simple language to eliminate the chance of misunderstandings, be specific about your intentions, state what treatments you are and are not willing to receive (especially in countries with different health standards and practices), nominate a healthcare proxy (someone who you trust to make decisions for you) and ensure that they understand, agree and that their contact details are accurate and finally, get it witnessed, preferably by someone with legal standing.

 

Expat Essentials: Safeguarding your longterm health, finances and family. Defining Moves - The Art of Successful Relocation. Information, Inspiration and Resources for the Expat Trailing Spouse / Accompanying Partner
How my children see it..

Ill health happens, and never when we expect it. When it does happen, it’s a knee jerk, all hand-on-deck approach, dominated by the need to get care quickly, the demands of the medical staff and the fear of the unknown. It is always inconvenient, unexpected and bewildering, and as a former nurse I can tell you that the last thing your partner or loved ones want to be doing is second guessing your choices. They need to know what you would want, and they need it in writing. It needs to be discussed, agreed upon, written down and easy to find. You can change your mind at any point, but we all need somewhere to start. 

And as a final piece of advice, bear in mind the words of wisdom from Phyllis Diller:

“Always be nice to your children – they are the ones who will choose your rest home.”